The Trial of Leopold and Loeb The Murder of Bobby Franks

Images



Robert "Bobby" Franks

May 21, 1924: Bobby Franks was kidnapped as he walked home from the Harvard School for Boys in Chicago, Illinois
May 21, 1924: Bobby Franks was kidnapped as he walked home from the Harvard School for Boys in Chicago, Illinois
Bobby Franks, circa 1919
Bobby Franks, circa 1919
Bobby Franks, circa 1923
Bobby Franks, circa 1923
Bobby Franks and his father, circa 1924
Bobby Franks and his father, circa 1924
May 1924: The funeral of 14-year-old Bobby Franks. He was buried at Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum in Chicago, Illinois.
May 1924: The funeral of 14-year-old Bobby Franks. He was buried at Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum in Chicago, Illinois.




Nathan Leopold, Jr. and Richard Loeb

Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb

1921: Junior Class Poem from the Harvard School for Boys attended by Nathan Leopold. His victim, Bobby Franks, would be kidnapped three years later while walking home from this school.
1921: Junior Class Poem from the Harvard School for Boys attended by Nathan Leopold. His victim, Bobby Franks, would be kidnapped three years later while walking home from this school.
1922: Harvard School for Boys yearbook entry for Nathan Leopold
1922: Harvard School for Boys yearbook entry for Nathan Leopold
1923: Harvard School for Boys graduation photo of Nathan Leopold
1923: Harvard School for Boys graduation photo of Nathan Leopold
Nathan Leopold, 1923
Nathan Leopold, 1923
Nathan Leopold, ca. 1924
Nathan Leopold, ca. 1924
Nathan Leopold in later years. He died of a heart attack on August 21, 1971 in Puerto Rico, at the age of 66.
Nathan Leopold in later years. He died of a heart attack on August 21, 1971 in Puerto Rico, at the age of 66.

Richard Loeb, ca. 1909, including the scowling cowboy pictures taken at age four. At bottom right, Loeb is shown with his governess.
Richard Loeb, ca. 1909, including the scowling cowboy pictures taken at age four. At bottom right, Loeb is shown with his governess.
The much talked-about "scowling" cowboy picture of Richard Loeb, taken at age four
The much talked-about "scowling" cowboy picture of Richard Loeb, taken at age four
May 1916: Page from "Richard's Magazine," which Loeb published as a child. He would have been 10 years and 11 months old at the time this issue was published.<BR><BR>Psychiatric testimony on Richard Loeb:
<BR>"In 1916, Richard Loeb, with five or six other boys published two issues of a small three by five inch 24 page journal, called Richard's Magazine. His contribution was that of being editor, manager, and author. His writings showed quite advanced thinking for a boy of his age, and reflected well the humanitarian environment of his home."
May 1916: Page from "Richard's Magazine," which Loeb published as a child. He would have been 10 years and 11 months old at the time this issue was published.

Psychiatric testimony on Richard Loeb:
"In 1916, Richard Loeb, with five or six other boys published two issues of a small three by five inch 24 page journal, called Richard's Magazine. His contribution was that of being editor, manager, and author. His writings showed quite advanced thinking for a boy of his age, and reflected well the humanitarian environment of his home."
Richard Loeb, 1924
Richard Loeb, 1924
Richard Loeb, 1924
Richard Loeb, 1924




Homes of Bobby Franks, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb
Chicago

Home of Bobby Franks
Home of Bobby Franks
Home of Nathan Leopold
Home of Nathan Leopold
Home of Richard Loeb
Home of Richard Loeb




The Finding of the Body of Bobby Franks

Map showing the region of the culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Map showing the region of the culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
Police examine the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered
May 23, 1924: The <em>Chicago Daily Tribune</em> reports the finding of Bobby Franks' body
May 23, 1924: The Chicago Daily Tribune reports the finding of Bobby Franks' body




Evidence

The glasses of Nathan Leopold were found near the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered. The finding of the glasses would eventually seal the fates of Leopold and Loeb.<BR><BR>Leopold's glasses are now in the Chicago History Museum.
The glasses of Nathan Leopold were found near the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered. The finding of the glasses would eventually seal the fates of Leopold and Loeb.

Leopold's glasses are now in the Chicago History Museum.
The glasses of Nathan Leopold were found near the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered. The finding of the glasses would eventually seal the fates of Leopold and Loeb.<BR><BR>Leopold's glasses are now in the Chicago History Museum.
The glasses of Nathan Leopold were found near the drainage culvert where the body of Bobby Franks was discovered. The finding of the glasses would eventually seal the fates of Leopold and Loeb.

Leopold's glasses are now in the Chicago History Museum.

May 21, 1924: The first ransom note
May 21, 1924: The first ransom note
May 21, 1924: The first ransom note, page 1
May 21, 1924: The first ransom note, page 1
After killing Bobby Franks in their vehicle, Leopold and Loeb had a meal at a hot dog stand.  They then drove to the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks near 118th street, north of Wolf Lake and concealed the body in a culvert.<BR><BR>After returning to Chicago, they called Franks's mother and said her son had been kidnapped. They then mailed the ransom note to the Franks family.
After killing Bobby Franks in their vehicle, Leopold and Loeb had a meal at a hot dog stand. They then drove to the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks near 118th street, north of Wolf Lake and concealed the body in a culvert.

After returning to Chicago, they called Franks's mother and said her son had been kidnapped. They then mailed the ransom note to the Franks family.
The second ransom note. The plan of the killers was to have the ransom thrown from a moving train, where it could then be collected without detection. Before the Franks family could pay the ransom, Tony Minke, a Polish immigrant, discovered the body. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body had been found, they destroyed the typewriter used to write the ransom note and burned the robe used to move the body.
The second ransom note. The plan of the killers was to have the ransom thrown from a moving train, where it could then be collected without detection. Before the Franks family could pay the ransom, Tony Minke, a Polish immigrant, discovered the body. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body had been found, they destroyed the typewriter used to write the ransom note and burned the robe used to move the body.
The typewriter Nathan Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
The typewriter Nathan Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left), Nathan Leopold (center) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow (right) examine the typewriter Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left), Nathan Leopold (center) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow (right) examine the typewriter Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
Nathan Leopold and defense attorney Clarence Darrow examine the typewriter Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
Nathan Leopold and defense attorney Clarence Darrow examine the typewriter Leopold used to type the ransom notes. When Leopold and Loeb learned that the body of Bobby Franks had been found, they destroyed the typewriter and burned the robe used to move the body.
At 11 a.m. on the morning of Wednesday, May 21, 1924, Leopold and Loeb met at the University of Chicago. They then drove to a Rent-a-Car facility on Michigan Avenue. There, Leopold rented a Willys-Knight, using the assumed name "Morton D. Ballard," to use for the kidnapping.
At 11 a.m. on the morning of Wednesday, May 21, 1924, Leopold and Loeb met at the University of Chicago. They then drove to a Rent-a-Car facility on Michigan Avenue. There, Leopold rented a Willys-Knight, using the assumed name "Morton D. Ballard," to use for the kidnapping.
At 11 a.m. on the morning of Wednesday, May 21, 1924, Leopold and Loeb met at the University of Chicago. They then drove to a Rent-a-Car facility on Michigan Avenue. There, Leopold rented a Willys-Knight, using the assumed name "Morton D. Ballard," to use for the kidnapping.
At 11 a.m. on the morning of Wednesday, May 21, 1924, Leopold and Loeb met at the University of Chicago. They then drove to a Rent-a-Car facility on Michigan Avenue. There, Leopold rented a Willys-Knight, using the assumed name "Morton D. Ballard," to use for the kidnapping.




The Interrogations, Confessions and Arrests

On May 25, 29, 30 and 31, 1924, Nathan Leopold was questioned by State Attorney Robert Crowe and Chief Detective Michael Hughes in connection with the kidnapping and murder of Bobby Franks.<BR><BR>At one point during the questioning, he was asked, "The suit that you have got on now is the suit you wore the night you placed the body there, is that it?" Leopold replied, "Yes, sir."
On May 25, 29, 30 and 31, 1924, Nathan Leopold was questioned by State Attorney Robert Crowe and Chief Detective Michael Hughes in connection with the kidnapping and murder of Bobby Franks.

At one point during the questioning, he was asked, "The suit that you have got on now is the suit you wore the night you placed the body there, is that it?" Leopold replied, "Yes, sir."
After killing Bobby Franks, Leopold and Loeb drove around with the body in the car, waiting for darkness. At about 8:00 p.m., Leopold stopped at a drugstore to phone a friend, Susan Lurie, with whom he had made a date for that night, to tell her he wouldn't be able to keep the date.<BR><BR>In this photo, Susan Lurie is questioned by Robert Crowe.
After killing Bobby Franks, Leopold and Loeb drove around with the body in the car, waiting for darkness. At about 8:00 p.m., Leopold stopped at a drugstore to phone a friend, Susan Lurie, with whom he had made a date for that night, to tell her he wouldn't be able to keep the date.

In this photo, Susan Lurie is questioned by Robert Crowe.
After killing Bobby Franks, Leopold and Loeb drove around with the body in the car, waiting for darkness. At about 8:00 p.m., Leopold stopped at a drugstore to phone a friend, Susan Lurie, with whom he had made a date for that night, to tell her he wouldn't be able to keep the date. Leopold and Loeb also stopped at this sandwich shop and bought two "red hot" sandwiches (i.e. hot dogs) and two bottles of root beer.
After killing Bobby Franks, Leopold and Loeb drove around with the body in the car, waiting for darkness. At about 8:00 p.m., Leopold stopped at a drugstore to phone a friend, Susan Lurie, with whom he had made a date for that night, to tell her he wouldn't be able to keep the date. Leopold and Loeb also stopped at this sandwich shop and bought two "red hot" sandwiches (i.e. hot dogs) and two bottles of root beer.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.<BR><BR>Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here conferring during the reading of their statements.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.

Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here conferring during the reading of their statements.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.<BR><BR>Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here soon after the confessions.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924,, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.

Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here soon after the confessions.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.<BR><BR>Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here soon after the confessions.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning on May 30 and 31, 1924,, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.

Leopold, Robert Crowe and Richard Loeb are shown here soon after the confessions.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.<BR><BR>Here, prosecutor Robert Crowe (front row, center) sits with Richard Loeb (seated on left in light-colored suit) and Nathan Leopold (seated to left of Crowe) after the boys confessed to the kidnapping and murder of Bobby Franks.
Leopold and Loeb spent seven months preparing for the murder, but upon questioning, their alibis fell apart. Soon after, Loeb confessed, followed by Leopold. Although their confessions corroborated most of the facts in the case, each blamed the other for the actual killing.

Here, prosecutor Robert Crowe (front row, center) sits with Richard Loeb (seated on left in light-colored suit) and Nathan Leopold (seated to left of Crowe) after the boys confessed to the kidnapping and murder of Bobby Franks.
Richard Loeb confessed on May 31, 1924, and Leopold's confession soon followed. Their stories matched most of the known evidence, but each blamed the other for the actual killing.<BR><BR>Here, Loeb is shown after arrest.
Richard Loeb confessed on May 31, 1924, and Leopold's confession soon followed. Their stories matched most of the known evidence, but each blamed the other for the actual killing.

Here, Loeb is shown after arrest.
Newspaper coverage after the confession
Newspaper coverage after the confession
Nathan Leopold at Chicago's Cook County Jail, May 31, 1924
Nathan Leopold at Chicago's Cook County Jail, May 31, 1924
Richard Loeb (left) and Nathan Leopold at Cook County Jail
Richard Loeb (left) and Nathan Leopold at Cook County Jail
Richard Loeb at Chicago's Cook County Jail
Richard Loeb at Chicago's Cook County Jail
A guard stands outside Richard Loeb's cell at Chicago's Cook County Jail, circa May 31, 1924
A guard stands outside Richard Loeb's cell at Chicago's Cook County Jail, circa May 31, 1924
Leopold and Loeb greet a musical performer while incarcerated at Chicago's Cook County Jail
Leopold and Loeb greet a musical performer while incarcerated at Chicago's Cook County Jail




Arraignment, Trial and Prison

Clarence Darrow, 1923. In July and August of 1924, he would act as lead defense counsel at the trial.
Clarence Darrow, 1923. In July and August of 1924, he would act as lead defense counsel at the trial.
Clarence Darrow would enter a surprise plea of "guilty" for the killers. Here, he is shown (far left) with Nathan Leopold (center right) and Richard Loeb (center, behind Leopold) in the courtroom during arraignment.
Clarence Darrow would enter a surprise plea of "guilty" for the killers. Here, he is shown (far left) with Nathan Leopold (center right) and Richard Loeb (center, behind Leopold) in the courtroom during arraignment.
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in the courtroom during arraignment
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in the courtroom during arraignment
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in the courtroom during arraignment
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in the courtroom during arraignment
State's Attorney Robert Crowe, 1924
State's Attorney Robert Crowe, 1924
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) and defense attorney Clarence Darrow
The defense team with Nathan Leopold (seated, center) and Richard Loeb (seated on right)
The defense team with Nathan Leopold (seated, center) and Richard Loeb (seated on right)
July 21, 1924: The first day of trial
July 21, 1924: The first day of trial
Psychiatrists (a.k.a. "alienists") examine Nathan Leopold
Psychiatrists (a.k.a. "alienists") examine Nathan Leopold
The psychiatrists were labeled as "the alienists"
The psychiatrists were labeled as "the alienists"
Drawing illustrating the findings of the psychiatric examinations.<BR><BR>Although the notation "Ego less than Leopold" in the upper right corner would seem to indicate that this pertains to Richard Loeb, it has been labeled as being associated with Nathan Leopold on other websites. This would seem to be borne out by biographical descriptions of Leopold from various sources.
Drawing illustrating the findings of the psychiatric examinations.

Although the notation "Ego less than Leopold" in the upper right corner would seem to indicate that this pertains to Richard Loeb, it has been labeled as being associated with Nathan Leopold on other websites. This would seem to be borne out by biographical descriptions of Leopold from various sources.
Newspapers intently covered the testimony of the psychiatrists (a.k.a. the "alienists")
Newspapers intently covered the testimony of the psychiatrists (a.k.a. the "alienists")
Richard Loeb glances at the camera as Nathan Leopold sits beside him in the courtroom
Richard Loeb glances at the camera as Nathan Leopold sits beside him in the courtroom
Courtroom scene
Courtroom scene
Crowd outside the courtroom
Crowd outside the courtroom
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb in the courtroom
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb in the courtroom
Leopold, Loeb, prosecutor Robert Crowe and others at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Leopold, Loeb, prosecutor Robert Crowe and others at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) with Leopold (center) and Loeb (right) at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (left) with Leopold (center) and Loeb (right) at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Nathan Leopold (center left), Richard Loeb (center right) and prosecutor Robert Crowe (right) at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Nathan Leopold (center left), Richard Loeb (center right) and prosecutor Robert Crowe (right) at the viewing of the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial
Nathan Leopold (center) stands with Richard Loeb to his right as they view the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial. Prosecutor Robert Crowe is shown on the far right.
Nathan Leopold (center) stands with Richard Loeb to his right as they view the rented Willys-Knight kidnapping car during the trial. Prosecutor Robert Crowe is shown on the far right.
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (center) confers with defense attorney Clarence Darrow
Prosecutor Robert Crowe (center) confers with defense attorney Clarence Darrow
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow makes a point
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow makes a point
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb, amused in the courtroom
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb, amused in the courtroom
Judge Caverly listens to the testimony of John Levinson.<BR><BR>At the Harvard School at about 2:30 p.m. on May 21, 1924, Loeb had struck up a conversation with Levinson, whom he knew. Loeb would later say that he lost track of Levinson afterwards. Thus, Leopold and Loeb chose another victim. The kidnapping of Bobby Franks would occur at about 5:00 p.m.
Judge Caverly listens to the testimony of John Levinson.

At the Harvard School at about 2:30 p.m. on May 21, 1924, Loeb had struck up a conversation with Levinson, whom he knew. Loeb would later say that he lost track of Levinson afterwards. Thus, Leopold and Loeb chose another victim. The kidnapping of Bobby Franks would occur at about 5:00 p.m.
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow makes a point
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow makes a point
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow confers with associates
Defense attorney Clarence Darrow confers with associates
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb in the courtroom
Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb in the courtroom
Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold
Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold
Prosecutor Robert Crowe reacts
Prosecutor Robert Crowe reacts
Newspaper coverage after the conviction
Newspaper coverage after the conviction
Leopold and Loeb are escorted to prison. Clarence Darrow's pleas for leniency fell on receptive ears, and the two murderers avoided the death penalty.  Both were sentenced to life in prison.<BR><BR>Loeb was killed by a fellow prisoner in 1936.  Leopold was released on parole in 1958, and died of a heart attack at age 66 on August 29, 1971.
Leopold and Loeb are escorted to prison. Clarence Darrow's pleas for leniency fell on receptive ears, and the two murderers avoided the death penalty. Both were sentenced to life in prison.

Loeb was killed by a fellow prisoner in 1936. Leopold was released on parole in 1958, and died of a heart attack at age 66 on August 29, 1971.
Leopold and Loeb are shown entering Joliet Prison in Illinois, where they were initially held. They would later be transferred to Stateville Penitentiary, where they taught classes in the prison school.
Leopold and Loeb are shown entering Joliet Prison in Illinois, where they were initially held. They would later be transferred to Stateville Penitentiary, where they taught classes in the prison school.
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb prison photos<BR><BR>Photos courtesy of German Federal Archive
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb prison photos

Photos courtesy of German Federal Archive
Caption:<BR>"JOLIET, Ill., July 31 [1957] -- HE'LL SEEK PAROLE UNTIL DEATH -- Smiling as he reads a prepared statement today, Nathan Leopold tells newsmen gathered in the chapel at Stateville Penitentiary that only death will end his appeals for parole. Illinois Gov. William Stratton yesterday denied executive clemency to Leopold, who is serving an 85-year sentence for the thrill-slaying of Bobby Franks in 1924."
Caption:
"JOLIET, Ill., July 31 [1957] -- HE'LL SEEK PAROLE UNTIL DEATH -- Smiling as he reads a prepared statement today, Nathan Leopold tells newsmen gathered in the chapel at Stateville Penitentiary that only death will end his appeals for parole. Illinois Gov. William Stratton yesterday denied executive clemency to Leopold, who is serving an 85-year sentence for the thrill-slaying of Bobby Franks in 1924."
1958: Nathan Leopold is released from prison on parole. He would eventually die of a heart attack on August 21, 1971 at the age of 66.
1958: Nathan Leopold is released from prison on parole. He would eventually die of a heart attack on August 21, 1971 at the age of 66.




Letters
Additional Letters

Dec 9, 1924: To Clarence Darrow, from Nathan Leopold Sr, and Allan Loeb, regarding payment for services in the Leopold-Loeb case
Dec 9, 1924: To Clarence Darrow, from Nathan Leopold Sr, and Allan Loeb, regarding payment for services in the Leopold-Loeb case
June 13, 1958: To Douglas Middleton, from Nathan Leopold, Jr., regarding Kirkland Warbler
June 13, 1958: To Douglas Middleton, from Nathan Leopold, Jr., regarding Kirkland Warbler
Jan 11, 1960: To Carl Haverlin, from Nathan Leopold, Jr., regarding fundraising
Jan 11, 1960: To Carl Haverlin, from Nathan Leopold, Jr., regarding fundraising
June 4, 1963: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold Jr.; handwritten letter regarding vacation
June 4, 1963: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold Jr.; handwritten letter regarding vacation
April 2, 1966: To Douglas Middleton, from Nathan Leopold,Jr., regarding a donation of Leopold's warblers to a museum
April 2, 1966: To Douglas Middleton, from Nathan Leopold,Jr., regarding a donation of Leopold's warblers to a museum
Sept 13, 1967: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold.Jr., regarding a capital punishment article
Sept 13, 1967: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold.Jr., regarding a capital punishment article
May 18, 1971: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold Jr., regarding possible appearance on a talk show in which he "would NOT wish to discuss anything before 1958."<BR><BR>Leopold had been paroled in 1958, and would die of heart trouble on August 21, 1971, a few months after this letter was written.
May 18, 1971: To Leonard Lyons, from Nathan Leopold Jr., regarding possible appearance on a talk show in which he "would NOT wish to discuss anything before 1958."

Leopold had been paroled in 1958, and would die of heart trouble on August 21, 1971, a few months after this letter was written.